Self delusion and escapism in the glass menagerie by tennessee williams

Amanda, Laura, and Tom Wingfield all seek to escape the dull and depressing reality of their situation. They engage in escapism by retreating into their own fantasies which push them farther apart. The play uses their desire to escape reality to emphasize the role of the s as an exciting escape from the s.

Self delusion and escapism in the glass menagerie by tennessee williams

Escapism Escapism is a very real aspect of the Wingfield family. Each member has its own methods and reasons for their desire to slip through the meshes of reality into the realms of fantasy though these reasons generally boil down to dislike of their depressing, mundane existences.

This wish to dismiss the painful reality of their lives through the use of fantasy or memory is manifested in such ways because of the futility and impossibility of a clean break from the family, and of real escape.

The family members are inextricably bound to one another by their joint need for escape and for fulfilment.

Self delusion and escapism in the glass menagerie by tennessee williams

This makes escapism extremely important in keeping their world in one piece. She buys jonquils, a flower she was obsessed with in her youth, to try and bring this spark of happiness and vivacity back into her life. Her only other method of escapism in the present is through her membership of the prestigious D.

Her membership is a way of holding on to her faded glory — hence she wears her best outfit all cheap or imitation and presents her sugary Southern charm to other D. But even this escapism proves relatively ineffectual: All Amanda wants is love and acceptance, something she had in abundance in her youth, but now seems scarce to her.

Her futile escapism strives for these, even if it means searching for it in places that are really out of reach for her. Tom uses escapism because he longs for adventure. He goes to the movies every night to escape the drab life he leads as a warehouse worker a profession he detests when he truly wishes to be a poet and travel the worldliving with his overbearing mother and dependent sister.

From the SparkNotes Blog

But, far more so than the other characters, Tom actually focuses on making his escapism a reality through attempts at practical escape. In the end he does follow in the footsteps of his father and successfully escapes the family — though how effectively this is achieved is debatable However, the third Wingfield really takes the biscuit when it comes to escapism, for Laura is the ultimate fantasist.

Almost everything Laura does or says in the play is for some kind of escape or escapism. Her disability and lack of confidence has led to an intense shyness. So she chooses to isolate herself in a world of glass, and dotes over the tiny ornaments to avoid interaction with others.

It is no surprise that this key symbol of escapism gives the play its title. She feels a far stronger connection with these creatures than any human, even ascribing the glass figures personalities.

The Glass Menagerie Thesis Statements and Important Quotes

She, in many ways, feels herself one of her own glass collection, and Tom notes her increasing regression into this world of fantasy: The glass animal that she particularly identifies with as her favourite is a glass unicorn, a creature that shares her singularity and fragility.

But the horn of this unicorn is broken off when it falls from a table knocked by Jim and Laura whilst dancing. But there is a difference between the unicorn and Laura. The unicorn becomes just like the other glass horses, and transfers from the world of fantasy to reality. The glass unicorn leaves the Wingfield home with Jim on his departure, whilst Laura remains trapped in her world of escapism.

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The Glass Menagerie Quotes by Tennessee Williams(page 2 of 2)

Davis, " Landscapes of the Dislocated Mind in Williams' 'The Glass Menagerie'," in Tennessee Williams: A Tribute Tom and his sister Laura is symbolically the actual glass menagerie, the play belongs to neither of them.

The Glass Menagerie was written by Tennessee Williams in and given this fact, it reflects some of the social norms, roles, and values of its time. One of the issues the reader of the play must consider is the way in which gender influences the personalities and behaviors of the characters.

Jul 30,  · The concept of escapism is a strong theme in Tennessee Williams’s play The Glass Menagerie. Amanda, Laura, and Tom Wingfield all seek to escape the dull and depressing reality of their situation. They engage in escapism by retreating into their own fantasies which push them farther ashio-midori.coms: 2.

The Glass Menagerie, Tennessee Williams The Glass Menagerie is a memory play by Tennessee Williams that premiered in and catapulted Williams from obscurity to fame. The play has strong autobiographical elements, featuring characters based on its author, his histrionic mother, and his mentally fragile sister Laura/5.

Created Date: 11/24/ PM. Jul 17,  · Escape and escapism are major themes in Tennessee Williams’ play, ‘The Glass Menagerie’. The themes span the entire play, control the lives of the characters, and are manifested throughout through Williams’ use of symbols, setting and structure.

The Glass Menagerie by Tennessee Williams: Escapism and Character Research Paper