An analysis of point of view in william faulkners a rose for emily

Most critics incorrectly consider the narrator, who uses "we" as though speaking for the entire town, to be young, impressionable, and male; however, on close examination, we realize that the narrator is not young and is never identified as being either male or female. Consider the opening sentence of the story and the reasons given for the townspeople's attending Miss Emily's funeral: Do the men remember her with affection? What has Miss Emily done to deserve the honor of being referred to as a "monument"?

An analysis of point of view in william faulkners a rose for emily

Susan Hurn Certified Educator The narrator has more information about Miss Emily, her father and the town that the main character would ever reveal to the reader. When a main character is the narrator, the story is told from a particular perspective, in this case, we would probably be even more sympathetic towards Emily than we are through the narrator's version.

We certainly would get to know Miss Emily's heart better.

An analysis of point of view in william faulkners a rose for emily

The story does not give us insight into The narrator has more information about Miss Emily, her father and the town that the main character would ever reveal to the reader. The story does not give us insight into her thinking, only that we assume she murdered Homer Barron so that he would never leave her.

We don't get to hear Emily's thoughts through the narrator, that would be a nice touch. But the essence of horror would be minimized if Miss Emily told the story, we would see the whole experience through her eyes, she would probably rationalize her behavior.

The point of view of a story is the most important decision a writer makes. It determines which story is told. Emily's version of the events would be quite different from someone else's version. Any person in the town would tell the story from his own experiences with Emily and his own attitudes toward her.

By choosing a narrator who is not a part of the town, Faulker is able to achieve several things. He can characterize the town in addition to developing Emily's character. The town itself becomes a character in the story. This says a lot about the nature of the small Southern town as Faulkner saw it: By using the objective narrator, Faulkner is able to maintain the suspense of the story.

The reader doesn't learn the story all at once because the narrator did not learn it that way. Faulkner's narrator tells the story in a disjointed way, not in chronological order. He gives the reader clues, out of order. As the reader starts putting the clues together, a growing sense of horror develops.

This makes it possible to preserve the possibility that the reader can develop some sympathy for Emily, despite her terrible act."A Rose for Emily" is a successful story not only because of its intricately complex chronology, but also because of its unique narrative point of view.

Most critics incorrectly consider the narrator, who uses "we" as though speaking for the entire town, to be young, impressionable, and male. The point of view for this story is different than most, representing Faulkner's unique style of telling a story. It is told in first person, meaning the narrator is a character in the story, but.

A Rose for Emily by William Faulkner. Home / Literature / A Rose for Emily / Analysis ; A Rose for Emily Analysis Literary Devices in A Rose for Emily. Symbolism, Imagery, Allegory.

Miss Emily's house is an important symbol in this story.

An analysis of point of view in william faulkners a rose for emily

(In general, old family homes are often significant symbols in Gothic literature.) Narrator Point. Summary and Analysis: "A Rose for Emily" The Narrator's Point of View Bookmark this page Manage My Reading List "A Rose for Emily" is a successful story not only because of its intricately complex chronology, but also because of its unique narrative point of view.

Point of View in “A Rose for Emily” A short story fiction is used to understand the complications involved in literary fiction. Point of view, an aspect in fiction will help a reader understand how the author has structured the events in the story/5(1). The fascinating narrator of "A Rose for Emily" is more rightly called "first people" than "first person." The narrator speaks sometimes for the men of Jefferson, sometimes for the women, and often for both.

It also spans three generations of Jeffersonians, including the generation of Miss Emily's.

The Narrator's Point of View